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[Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge- EXCEEDINGLY RARE: ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PRINT] ORIGINAL ALBUMEN OF THE ROSSETTI FAMILY TAKEN BY LEWIS CARROLL, OCTOBER, 7, 1863

[Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge- EXCEEDINGLY RARE: ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PRINT] ORIGINAL ALBUMEN OF THE ROSSETTI FAMILY TAKEN BY LEWIS CARROLL, OCTOBER, 7, 1863

by Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge [i.e. Lewis Carroll]
166-173 (h) x 222mm, i.e. very slightly trapezoidal. Original albumen photograph. This famous photograph is one of a series of photographs taken of the Rossetti family by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, (i.e. Lewis Carroll), in the garden of Dante Gabriel Rossetti's house in Cheyne Walk on 7 October 1863. On verso, written in the hand of Helen Angeli Rossetti, daughter of William Michael Rossetti: "Photograph taken by Ch. L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) [sic] in the Cheyne Walk Garden, c. 1865? Probably 1863 (Autumn)." The composition, arranged by Carroll and subsequently photographed and printed by Carroll, shows the Rossetti's in their garden, from left to right: Christina G. Rossetti, Maria Francesca Rossetti, Frances Livinia Rossetti and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, the latter two seated at a table playing chess. Of a similar print, Christina Rossetti wrote, describing the day ìthe author of Wonderland photographed us in the gardenî: ìIt was our aim to appear in the full family group of five; but whilst various others succeeded, that particular negative was spoilt by a shower, and I possess a solitary print taken from it in which we appear as if splashed by inkî (quoted by Mackenzie Bell, Christina Rossetti [London, 1898]. From Jaqueline Banerjee, "Morton Cohen explains that in early October 1863 Dodgson was staying with the sculptor Alexander Munro, who took him to see the Rossettis. Dante Gabriel was "most hospitable in his offers of the use of house and garden for picture-taking" (Cohen 240) and he was able to take two pictures of Christina, and one of Rossetti himself. Dodgson wrote in his Dairy, "I afterwards looked through a huge volume of drawings, some of which l am to photograph ó a great treat, as I had never seen such exquisite drawing before. I dined with Mr. Rossetti, and spent some of the evening there.... A memorable day" (qtd. in Cohen 240). He returned the next day and photographed the whole family, subsequently photographing Rossetti's drawings and one of his models. The contact with the Rossettis proved useful, introducing him to Swinburne and others. Rossetti looks relaxed and genial in this portrait, which gives a flavour of the pleasant visit." Edward Wakeling ("The Photographs of Lewis Carroll, A Catalog Raisonne") describes the photographs by Carroll taken at the Rossettis, with a census of those found, listing only five, of which only one is the full image our example, the others being either vignette prints, and one without Christina Rossetti. Provenance: this photograph originally the property of William Michael Rossetti, and then by descent to his daughter, Helen Rossetti Angeli (who inscribed the verso), and given to William E. Fredeman in 1963. Of great rarity and importance. Indeed, no similar quality original Lewis Carroll photograph of the Rossettis has sold ion the open market in recent memory.
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THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS, And What Alice Found There

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS, And What Alice Found There

by CARROLL, Lewis (DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge)
Macmillan, 1877. Fortieth thousand, i.e. a later issue of the first edition as per Williams Madan Green 84. Publisher's special deluxe binding of white textured paper covered boards to imitate vellum, with gilt lettering and vignettes, in the exceptionally rare unprinted original lilac dustwrapper. All edges gilt. Author's presentation copy, inscribed on the half title, "May Forshall from the Author / Dec 3. 1877" A fine copy with exceptionally clean white covers and bright gilt, just a couple of trivial marks to the edges. Internally fresh with tight hinges. Two pin holes to the front endpaper and a faint mark to the edge of the preliminary pages. Dustwrapper rather worn, with small chips to the spine ends and corners and a larger chip to the corner of the back panel. An exceptional copy. Included with this book is an original carte-de-visite mounted photograph of Mary Forshall taken by Carroll, numbered by him (2485) in violet ink on the reverse. Black and white illustrations throughout by John Tenniel. Mary Forshall (known as May) was the daughter of the Highgate physician Francis Hyde Forshall, an acquaintance of Charles Dodgson's. Dodgson recalls his first meeting with May in a diary entry of 27 November 1877, "Dined with Sampson, to meet Dr. Forshall with his sister, etc., and May Forshall, a nice child of 10." In the 1 December 1877 entry, Dodgson mentions May "came to be photographed" at 11am, an appointment which was repeated two days later, with the result that Carroll took, "5 negatives, of which 2 failed". It was on the second meeting that Dodgson presented one of his newly received copies of Through the Looking Glass, in a specially commissioned presentation binding. Dodgson took an obsessive interest in the production of all his books and would habitually order small quantities to be bound up in a variety of non-standard styles and hues for his own use, wanting to have a ready supply of special bindings, which differed form the shop bought version, to be used as presentation gifts. Of these styles, the white binding seems to have been the one chosen by Dodgson for his most favoured presentations. It is also a style of binding which has fascinated latter day collectors. For the publication of The Hunting of The Snark, the year before this book, Dodgson had commissioned an array of coloured bindings including "20 bindings in white vellum and gold". This was changed to parchment style paper or cloth and gold, on economic grounds. Dodgson appears to have placed a similar order for both Alice (then in its sixth edition) and Through the Looking Glass, which were delivered late in 1877. They are now of the utmost scarcity, seldom appearing in commerce. When they do, they are usually in a poor or repaired state, as the fragile white boards were particularly prone to damage. In this case the presence of the original dustwrapper, itself probably a unique occurrence, has meant that the white binding has remained in exceptional condition. Williams, Madan, Green 84 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover; In Dust Jacket]
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

by Carroll, Lewis
New York: Appleton, 1866. 1st American edition / Ist edition, second issue.. Hardcover. Very good. In 1865 Macmillan printed this book in England and recalled it because John Tenniel, the illustrator considered the printing of the illustrations unsatisfactory. After consulting with Tenniel, Lewis Carroll authorized Macmillan to sell 1,952 bound copies to Appleton in New York with a new title page replacing Macmillan with D. Appleton and dated 1866. The new title page was tipped onto the excised stub of the Macmillan 1865 edition. Top edge and fore edge gilt. A few small waterspots on the front cover. The half title page has some writing on it and the lower fore edge corner has had a professional repair of the lower fore edge corner not affection the text. Spine a little darkened otherwise a tight copy. Michael Hancher, author of The Tenniel Illustrations to the "Alice" Books was in the shop this summer and examined our copy of this book. There is a census of the extant copies of the 1866 Appleton Alice as announced by John Lindseth in PBSA some time ago that is still a work in progress. He goes on to say, "Extant copies of what has become known as "The Appleton Alice" have turned out to become quite elusive. The British Library is the only institutional holder found in the UK. Some seventy institutional holders are found in the United States and Canada and one in Switzerland. Fewer than twenty private holders have been identified. Our copy may add one to that small number. In his note Lindseth distinguishes four different states of the text, which apparently have no priority. Hancher goes on in his email to write, "I also attach two pages from the new chapter about "Printing" in the revised edition of my Tenniel book. Apparently the image quality for the illustrations of the suppressed Macmillan printing of 1865 (which got recycled as the Appleton edition of 1866) varies from copy to copy and image to image, depending on how much ink leaked through from the printing on the other side of a particular leaf. Tenniel must have been given - and rejected - one of the worse copies. Had he been given your copy he might not have balked." [Attributes: First Edition]
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. Screen play by Joseph L. Mankiewicz.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. Screen play by Joseph L. Mankiewicz.

by [Carroll, Lewis] / Mankiewicz, Joseph L.
[Los Angeles, Paramount Pictures, 1933]. Folio (220 x 354 mm). (3), A1-8, 642, 4 ff. Mimeographed typescript and storyboard comprising 642 illustrations by William Cameron Menzies. Extra-illustrated with 44 black and white production photographs. Contemporary giltstamped full red morocco, spine gilt in compartments. Signed by 27 members of the cast. Copy owned by Charlotte Henry, the actress who played Alice, signed and inscribed by her to another girl on the frontispiece photograph: "To Ann Waddington from Alice in Wonderland / Charlotte Henry". De luxe copy, owned by "Alice", of the script to the 1933 Paramount Pictures adaptation of Lewis Carroll's classic. The script appears to have been available in a numbered edition (number 22 was sold at Sotheby's in 1975) and an un-numbered edition for members of the production (cast-member Ronald "Baby LeRoy" Overacker's copy sold at Bonhams, Los Angeles, in 2019); both were bound in wrappers. The present specimen is a sumptuously bound, extra-illustrated edition for the actress who played the title character, featuring not only 44 inserted black-and-white production photographs (captioned on the reverse), but also the signatures of 27 cast members on the half-title. - Despite an all-star cast including Cary Grant as the Mock Turtle, Gary Cooper as The White Knight, W. C. Fields as Humpty Dumpty, Edna May Oliver as the Red Queen, Edward Everett Horton as The Hatter, Charlie Ruggles as The March Hare, and Baby LeRoy as The Joker, the film adaptation proved a famously unsuccessful experiment by Paramount. It remains the only major live-action Hollywood production to adapt Carroll's original "Alice" stories. Charlotte Henry (1914-1980) enjoyed her first leading role as Alice, beating over 6,800 other actresses who auditioned. The recipient Ann Waddington, to whom Henry gifted her sumptuous memento, is unidentified. - The American film director, screenwriter, and producer Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1909-93) enjoyed a long Hollywood career. He is best remembered for "All About Eve" (1950), which was nominated for 14 Academy Awards and won six. William Cameron Menzies (1896-1957) was a hugely influential production designer and art director. He received an Honorary Academy Award "for outstanding achievement in the use of color for the enhancement of dramatic mood" in "Gone With the Wind". - Occasional tears to some leaves, some photographs with creases and tears, occasional child's scribbles. Hinges professionally restored. A unique survival. [Attributes: Soft Cover]
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

by DODGSON, Charles L. (Lewis Carroll) (Salvador Dali - illustrator)
NY: Maecenas Press - Random House, 1969. LIMITED SIGNED EDITION OF 200. Original full tan straight grained leather clamshell box, 18-1/4" x 13-1/2", gilt lettered spine, with the original 2 gilt stamped black silk chemise's, illustrated by Salvador Dali, complete with frontis and 12 illustrations, the frontispiece is an original signed etching by Salvador Dali, limited to 200 Roman numbered copies on Rives paper with the portfolio containing an additional suite of 13 plates on Japan nacre, of which this is copy CXCI. The clamshell box is in VERY GOOD condition, with the two original leather ties and black clasps, internally clean and bright, about as nice as you're ever going to find it. [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]
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"Off with her Head!" Original signed watercolor illustration by Peter Newell for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (opposite p. 116). Together with a copy of the published book.

by NEWELL, Peter. CARROLL, Lewis.
Harper & Brothers, New York and London, 1901. xvii, 193 pp. With forty full-page illustrations in tint from drawings by Peter Newell. Original artwork 11 x 7 inches, matted and framed. Volume 8vo, publisher's gilt art vellum, t.e.g., in green gilt dust jacket and publisher's printed two-part box. First Peter Newell edition. Very fine original condition; the book is unopened. There is some light soiling and wear to the publisher's box. Unlike the published illustration, the original drawing depicts Alice in a delicately colored pink-flowered dress, with rosy cheeks and lips, a gold necklace, and a red ribbon in her hair. The Queen and her entourage, by contrast, are largely in monochrome with only faint touches of color (lips and tongues). [Attributes: Hard Cover; In Dust Jacket]
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

by Carroll, Lewis
London: Macmillan, 1866. First. hardcover. Very good. A very good first UK published edition (after the suppressed UK edition that was not distributed) in a very good original cloth with some repair on the hinge. First issue inverted S on the table of contents. Housed in an elaborate leather case.[Attributes: First Edition]
Offered by Bookbid
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Through The Looking-Glass And What Alice Found There.

Through The Looking-Glass And What Alice Found There.

by DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge: (Lewis Carroll)
London: Macmillan & Co., 1872. PRE-PUBLICATION PRESENTATION COPY FIRST EDITION FIRST ISSUE. 1 vol., illustrated By John Tenniel, inscribed by Dodgson on the half-title "Joanna de Morlot Pollock / from the Author / Christmas 1871", in purple ink. Bound in full red morocco, ribbed gilt decorated spine, spine panels tooled with characters from Alice, covers ruled in gilt, covers center panel tooled with the Queens, gilt dentelles, all edges gilt, original cloth covers and spine bound in rear, by Bayntun, IN AS NEW CONDITION. Joanna de Morlot Pollock (at the time 9 years old) was the daughter of Charles Edward Pollock, and his second wife Georgina Archibald. In 1865 Charles married his third wife, Amy Menella, daughter of Dodgson's cousin Hassard Hume Dodgson. The author attended the wedding, and recorded a visit to the family on 24 June 1866 in his diary, noting "we saw the pretty little Joanna", later that year (30 July) taking her photograph. By the time of a visit in July 1872 he noted that Joanna had "grown out of all recollection.". Edward Wakeling notes in Lewis Carroll's Diaries that on 8 December 1871 Dodgson had signed only 100 copies of Through the Looking Glass. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Hard Cover]
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Alice's adventures in Wonderland.

by CARROLL, Lewis.
New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1866. FIRST EDITION, SECOND ISSUE. Frontispiece and 41 illustrations by John Tenniel. Exquisite full morocco binding by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, covers ruled in blind with the same gilt designs as on the original cover (Alice on the front, the Cheshire Cat on the back), spine in compartments with gilt designs and the author, title and date in gilt, intricately decorated gilt dentelles, with the original binding bound in on 3 separate leaves (front, spine and rear covers). Overall a gorgeous clean copy preserved in a cloth box.
£17,693.01
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Effarante lettre de Lewis Carroll adressée au père de sa nouvelle « amie-enfant », Amy Burton

Effarante lettre de Lewis Carroll adressée au père de sa nouvelle « amie-enfant », Amy Burton

by Lewis CARROLL
1877. CARROLL, Lewis (1832-1898) Lettre autographe signée « C.L. Dodgson » à Mr Burton Eastbourne, le 25 août [18]77, 2 p. in-12 à l’encre rose Troublante lettre adressée au père de sa nouvelle « amie-enfant », à laquelle il souhaite faire parvenir un exemplaire d’Alice au pays des merveilles Traduction de l’anglais : « Cher Monsieur, J’espère que vous excusez la liberté que je prends en l’adressant à vous, ainsi que celle que j’ai prise voici quelques jours en me liant d’amitié avec votre petite fille, mais je crois que même un homme qui ne serait pas, comme moi, un grand amoureux des enfants, ne pourrait manquer d’être attiré par elle.Comme je souhaite déposer pour elle, là où elle habite, un petit livre (dont j’ai souvent fait cadeau à de jeunes amies), j’ai entrepris deux expéditions, en vain, pour trouver où elle demeurait. Faute d’avoir la bonne adresse, et ne la voyant plus sur la plage, la seule solution me semble de lui écrire à son adresse en ville. Si vous m’autorisez à lui offrir le livre, auriez-vous l’amabilité de me dire si je dois lui envoyer à Londres ou, sinon, à quelle adresse. (Le livre s’intitule Les Aventures d’Alice au pays des merveilles). Croyez, Monsieur, en mes sentiments les meilleurs. C.L. Dogson (de Christ Church Oxford) » Texte original : “Dear sir, I hope you will excuse the liberty I am taking in addressing you, as well as the liberty I took a few days ago in making friends with your little daughter, but I think that even one who is not, as I am, a great lover of children, could hardly fail to be attracted by her. Wishing to leave for her at her lodgings a little book (on I have several time given to little friends) I have made two expeditions, in vain, to find the lodgings. Not having the right address and seeing her no more on the beach, the only course seems to write to the town address. If you will allow me to present her with the book, would you kindly tell me whether to send it to London or to what address. (The book is called Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland). Believe me truly yours, C.L. Dodgson (of Christ Church Oxford)” Adressée à M. Burton, cette lettre est écrite neuf jours après la rencontre de l’écrivain avec sa fille, ainsi que le rapporte son Journal à la date du 16 août 1877 : « Suis allé sur l’embarcadère dans la soirée et ai fait une autre heureuse rencontre. Ma nouvelle amie s’appelle Mabel Burton. Elle semble avoir environ 8 ans. ( ) Elle est absolument charmante et sans un atome de timidité. Je n’ai jamais été ami avec une enfant aussi facilement et aussi rapidement. » On ignore pas le goût de l’écrivain pour les jeunes filles. Carroll annonce ici explicitement à un père de famille – il ignore alors que ce dernier est décédé – qu’il compte se lier d’amitié avec sa fille, certes non sans ambiguïté. En dépit de ces considérations, débute une amitié, qui dépasse la perplexité mêlée de stupéfaction de Mrs Harriet Burton, mère de Mabel. La fille ne comptait d’ailleurs pas faire part à la mère de sa rencontre avec l’« étrange gentleman », expression de la jeune fille même. Le 28 août, Carroll écrit une lettre à Mrs Harriet Burton dans laquelle nous comprenons qu’elle a accepté qu’il envoie un exemplaire des Aventures d’Alice au pays des merveilles à Mabel. Bien que le roman soit de plusieurs années antérieur à l’amitié entre Carroll et la petite fille, il n’est toutefois pas interdit d’imaginer Mabel comme l’ombre portée d’Alice, une héroïne par la procuration du regard d’écrivain. Bibliographie : « Lewis Carroll Lettres inédites à Mabel Amy Burton et à ses parents ». Pierre E. Richard, ed. de Maule. 2008 [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]
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Alice's Adventures Underground

Alice's Adventures Underground

by Carroll, Lewis
London: Macmillan, 1886. First Edition. 1st edition of the replication of Carroll's original manuscript for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, with his original title, his own 37 illustrations, and reproducing his own handwriting. This edition differs from the published book in that Macmillan had Carroll change the title, delete a few personal references, and add 2 chapters, and they hired a professional illustrator, but our book is the original. Presentation copy from the author to the publisher, inscribed (to Emma Macmillan), "Mrs. Macmillan from the author" and dated in January, the month that all the earliest presentation copies were inscribed. A bright and beautiful copy, near fine in original cloth. Best copy in the world? Probably. Fine. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]
Offered by Biblioctopus
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Aventures d'Alice au pays des merveilles. Traduit de l'Anglais par Henri Bué.

Aventures d'Alice au pays des merveilles. Traduit de l'Anglais par Henri Bué.

by Carroll (Lewis, pseud. for Charles L. Dodgson)
Macmillan, 1869. FIRST EDITION IN FRENCH, frontispiece (with tissue guard) and vignette illustrations by Tenniel, pp. [xii], 196, crown 8vo, original blue cloth, by Burn, with his diamond ticket on lower pastedown, backstrip gilt lettered direct, boards with triple gilt border, and central illustration (Alice and pig on upper; Cheshire cat on lower) within circular triple line frame, a little rubbing and light bumps to extremities, some light wear at backstrip ends, a.e.g., chocolate chalked endpapers, the flyleaf chipped at top corner, cracking to rear hinge with webbing exposed, good. Inscribed by the Dodgson on the half-title: 'Beatrice Cecilia Harington, from the Author'. The recipient was the eldest daughter of Richard Harington, Principal of Brasenose College and his second wife, Mary; her half-brother (also Richard) was a Christ Church contemporary and friend of Dodgson, who had translated a poem by the latter into Latin for the Daniel Press 'Garland of Rachel'. Beatrice, like her sister (Alice Margaret), was among Dodgson's child-sitters; she was seventeen years of age at the time this translation (which followed the German in the same year as the earliest translations of Carroll's chef d'oeuvre) - Harington was later the first Head of St. Margaret's House, Bethnal Green. [Attributes: First Edition]
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Alice's Abenteuer im Wunderland (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland) Ueberstezt von Antonie Zimmermann.

Alice's Abenteuer im Wunderland (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland) Ueberstezt von Antonie Zimmermann.

by CARROLL, Lewis.
London: Macmillan und Comp.,, 1869. Presentation copy of the first foreign language translation First German language edition, presentation copy, inscribed by the author "Margaret Evelyn Hardy, from the Author" on the half-title. The first foreign language translation of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland was published in February 1869 before a French translation of August 1869. The original English text was first published in 1866. Williams, Madan, Green, and Crutch praise the illustrations in this edition and note "the reproductions of the woodcuts in this German edition are excellent, and bear comparison with those in any other issue of Alice in Wonderland". The contents listing exactly copied the pagination of the English edition so that for every chapter except the first, the page numbers are incorrect. Gathorne-Hardy, 1st Earl of Cranbrook, (1814-1906) became known to Carroll's Oxford circle in 1865 when he was nominated to stand in the Oxford University constituency. There were three candidates: William Gladstone, William Heathcote and Gathorne Gathorne-Hardy. Carroll records signing a voting paper in his diary for 10 July and Jackson's Oxford Journal for 15 July notes that "Dr Dodson [sic], of Christ Church" voted for Gladstone. The final result was Heathcote 1331, Gathorne-Hardy 767, and Gladstone 735 votes. The election prompted Carroll to write his Dynamics of a Particle (1865) comprising a satirical pamphlet masquerading as a mathematical treatise in which chapter two refers to the contest between Gathorne-Hardy and Gladstone. The politician was responsible for Carroll's admittance to the public area of the House of Commons on 8 April 1867, and when Gathorne-Hardy visited Oriel College, Oxford, Carroll invited him to Christ Church to have his photograph taken. Carroll noted in his diary on 10 June 1867 "He had not long to spare, but I succeeded in taking two pictures of him, neither of them, I fear, particularly successful". Gathorne-Hardy had married Jane Orr in 1838 and they were to have four sons and five daughters. On 24 June 1867 the politician wrote to Carroll stating "my little girl's names are Margaret Evelyn, and I am sure she would dearly treasure Alice in English and French, but has no right to tax you for both". At the time of writing, there were no foreign language translations. A correspondence between the two men commenced and, in time, Carroll certainly sent both English and French editions of Alice. This inscription in an unrequested German translation is previously unknown (unrecorded by Carlson and Eger). Another hand other than Carroll's has added the date of 1871. Carroll continued to send copies of his books to Margaret: she also received an inscribed copy of Through the Looking-Glass dated Christmas 1871 and a copy of The Hunting of the Snark with an inscription dated 24 April 1876. Carroll's diary entry for 12 September 1877 records a visit by the author to the Hardy family to "meet Evelyn again (she is now 'Miss Evelyn')" when he "walked on the Parade with Mrs. Hardy and Misses K. and E." Octavo. Original green cloth, spine lettered in gilt, pictorial roundels and triple-line borders to covers in gilt, brown coated endpapers, binder's label ("Burn & Co") to rear pastedown, all edges gilt. Frontispiece and 42 illustrations by John Tenniel. Some fading and bubbling to covers, spine slightly soiled, corners slightly bumped, minor restoration to spine and hinges, some browning and foxing throughout; a very good copy. Williams, Madan, Green, and Crutch 71; Carlson and Eger, Dodgson at Auction 1893-1999, 1999.
Offered by Peter Harrington
£12,500.00
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Editor's Holograph Manuscript of THE DIARIES OF LEWIS CARROLL, NOW FIRST EDITED AND SUPPLEMENTED by ROGER LANCELYN GREEN. Vol. I: 1855-67 Vol. II: 1867-98

Editor's Holograph Manuscript of THE DIARIES OF LEWIS CARROLL, NOW FIRST EDITED AND SUPPLEMENTED by ROGER LANCELYN GREEN. Vol. I: 1855-67 Vol. II: 1867-98

by (Carroll, Lewis) Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge [edited by Roger Lancelyn GREEN]
Poulton-Lancelyn, Bebington, Wirral, 1953. 354 leaves, foliated [1-3], i-vi, 1-181, [1]; [1]-163. With numerous corrections, and occasional notes on rectos and margins. 1 vols. 4to. Some minor wear at edges, and slight occasional soiling, but overall very good, and an impressively preserved manuscript in its entirety. Custom morocco-backed slipcase and chemise. 354 leaves, foliated [1-3], i-vi, 1-181, [1]; [1]-163. With numerous corrections, and occasional notes on rectos and margins. 1 vols. 4to. First Publication of the Diaries of Lewis Carroll: the Editor's Manuscript. Before the publication of this work, the Diaries of Lewis Carroll had been largely unavailable after their temporary disappearance following the publication of Collingwood's THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF LEWIS CARROLL in 1898. When, at last, all but 4 (which were lost) of the original 13 volumes reappeared in a cellar, Dodgson's nieces and Executors of the estate commissioned Green to undertake the editing and publication of their uncle's diaries.
Green's book was the first publication of the diaries, and, until recently, it was all that has been available to scholars who were unable to consult the original manuscript (now in the British Library). Even though Green and the family made some deliberate omissions, it is the first major transcription of Lewis Carroll's famous Diaries to appear in print. As Green noted, "The fact that the Diaries have been inaccessible for the general critic, biographer and research student has led to the suggestion that they contain information about Lewis Carroll which his pious relations wish to keep from the world. That rumour can be now set at rest once and for all: they contain nothing whatsoever about Lewis Carroll that the world at large could not read." Green describes the editorial process and remarks "Thus family troubles were, naturally, entered into the Diaries, and family feeling has as naturally wished to keep those personal matters private."
The manuscript, closely written in Green's clear hand, contains numerous interesting notes and directions to the printer/ publisher which are not included in the published version, as for example this note on a separate leaf, dated Sept. 1951, at the end of Volume I:
"NOTE TO PUBLISHER. The next section of the Diary, from July 12 to Sept 13, 1867, was sold to Mr. M.L. Parish [sic] of Pine Valley, New Jersey, and privately printed for him in an edition of sixty-six copies with the title TOUR IN 1867 BY C.L. DODGSON. It was published in 1935 ... [as part of] THE RUSSIAN JOURNAL AND OTHER SELECTIONS ... by E.P. Dutton and Co. New York. If desired, this can be included in the present book as Chapter VIII of Volume One ... it is felt by the Editor and Miss Dodgson that the decision whether to include this extra material must be left to the Publisher. R.L.G. Sept: 1951
£12,581.70
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Through The Looking-Glass And What Alice Found There

Through The Looking-Glass And What Alice Found There

by CARROLL Lewis [ie DODGSON Charles Lutwidge] 1832-1898
The Suppressed 'Sixtieth Thousand' issue, presentation copy from the author to the Mechanics Institute with presentation ink-stamp to title. In the original pictorial red cloth, gilt edge tooling. Spine lightly sunned, gilt titles & tooling, edges bumped. Internally, half title, frontis, [11], [1], [1], 2-224 pp, [4] adverts, 50 illustrations, a.e.g., black endpapers, very slight pulling to one gathering, slightly cocked. Housed in a custom half red morocco gilt over red cloth drop-back-box, gilt titles to spine, gilt tooling & titles to morocco label to upper board. A Very Good example. (185*124 mm). Scarce. Only 4 copies known to exist in the original red cloth. Up until as recently as 1990 Lovett noted that 'no copies of the 60th thousand in standard binding have been recorded' (p.21). Copies rebound for the Mechanic's Institute were known, but it is only in the last few years that Selwyn Goodacre has managed to trace 4 copies in the original cloth, one of these now lost (Selwyn Goodacre, unpublished census). This suppressed issue was, according to Carroll, riddled with printing production faults. The illustrations were over-printed, the pages badly folded and it led to him threatening to terminate his contract with Macmillan. This had already been an issue for the first edition of the 1865 Alice, which was recalled after Tenniel complained about the quality of the printing. On receiving the first 6 copies of this issue, Carroll wrote a letter to Frederick Macmillan, stating that: "the book is worthless ... much as I should regret the having to sever a connection now lasted nearly 30 years, I shall feel myself absolutely compelled to do so, unless I can have some assurance that better care shall be taken, in future, to ensure that my books shall be of the best artistic quality attainable for the money" (Letters p.995). Only 60 copies had gone out when Carroll intervened. He asked Macmillan to destroy the remainder of the edition, which led to 'Through the Looking Glass' being out of print until 1897. He did later change his mind about destroying the remaining copies of this edition, and instead favored rebinding it and distributing it to charitable institutions, as had been done with the first suppressed Alice. (Williams, MacLean, Green & Crotch 84b; Selwyn H. Goodacre "Lewis Carrolls Rejection of the 60th Thousand of Through the Looking Glass"; The Book Collector Summer 1975 p251-56).
Offered by Madoc Books
£12,250.00
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Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

by CARROLL, Lewis
Paris: Black Sun Press, 1930. Limited. hardcover. near fine. Laurencin. Illustrated with 6 color lithographs by Marie Laurencin printed by Desjobert of Paris. Oblong 4to, 3/4 red morocco binding over patterned boards, gilt spine lettering and decorations, with a small inset of a white rabbit on the side panel, top edge gilt. Paris: Black Sun Press, 1930. Limited Edition. Of an edition of 790 copies, this is one of only 20 copies with a duplicate set of plates in sanguine. Five of the extra plates are signed in pencil by Laurencin, who has also signed the colophon page, which states that this is number 19 of the American Edition. Although the binding is unsigned it was likely done by the Bennett Book Studio which did a number of similar ones. Fine, in a leather-tipped slipcase which is missing the top edge.[Attributes: Signed Copy]
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Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

by Lewis, Carroll
Paramount Pictures, Hollywood, California, 1933. Mimeographed manuscript of the Joseph L. Mankiewicz screenplay. Illustrated with six hundred and forty two pages with drawings and designs by William Cameron Menzies with an additional eight page prologue and four page epilogue. Original brown paper wrappers (the cover title page and half title page are detached). This massive and heavy 646 page screenplay (13 3/4" x 8 1/4", 3 inches thick) turned out to be impossible for the cast to handle and a more traditional 200 page version was designed for use on the film, the illustrations were removed and the text reset. While Norman Z. McLeod is credited as director, Menzies stepped in to direct when McLeod became ill during the filming (Curtis, page 142). Very good. A Lewis Carroll rarity. Provenance: estate of actor Baby LeRoy who appeared in the film as "Joker" at the age of two. See pages 134-149 in James Curtis' "William Cameron Menzies" book for details on the filming of Lewis Carroll's classic books. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

by CARROLL Lewis
1866. First Edition . CARROLL, Lewis. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. London: Macmillan, 1866. Octavo, mid-20th century full red morocco, elaborately gilt-decorated spine, raised bands, all edges gilt. $14,500.First authorized English edition of Carroll's cherished romp through the realm of nonsense, illustrated with 42 engravings by John Tenniel, handsomely bound by Riviere & Son, with original cloth-gilt at rear.""More than a flare of genius,"" Alice's Adventures in Wonderland ""was the spiritual volcano of children's books"" (Darton, 260). ""Historians of children's literature universally agree that [its] publication… marks the liberation of children's books from the restraining hand of the moralists"" (Carpenter & Prichard, 102). A mesmerizing masterpiece of comic nonsense, Alice also demonstrates Carroll's gift for recognizing ""the child's inner fears, wishes, intelligence and imagination. He unleashed thousands of children's minds… and invited them to laugh"" (Silvey, 124). ""It is, in a word, a book of that extremely rare kind which will belong to all the generations to come until the language becomes obsolete"" (Sir Walter Besant). First published and authorized English edition, preceded only by the extraordinarily rare suppressed 1865 London edition, of which only about 20 copies are known to exist, and the scarce New York edition of 1866. Lewis Carroll Handbook 46. Lewis Carroll at Texas 3. See PMM 354. Bookplate. Newspaper clipping laid in.A bit of foxing to front blank endpapers only. A beautifully bound copy with the original cloth bound in. [Attributes: First Edition]
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ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND

ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND

by Lewis Carroll (C. L. Dodgson); Illustrated by Salvador Dali
Maecenas Press, 1969. Book. Fine. Hardcover. Signed by Author(s). FIRST. First edition. Maecenas Press/Random House, New York, 1969. Illustrations by Salvador Dali. #668 of a signed limited edition of 2500 copies , issued as a portfolio containing 12 color wood engravings and a color etching. Signed by the illustrator on the title page. Signed by Dali on the title page, with an original etched frontispiece in four colors signed in the plate, and 12 color heliogravures each with an original remarque. Press/Random House, New York, 1969. Illustrations by Salvador Dali. 1147 of a signed limited edition of 2500 copies , issued as a portfolio containing 12 color wood engravings and a color etching. Signed by the illustrator on the title page. twelve full page color heliogravures. Interior contents bright, clean and fresh. Spine of morocco case lovely copy to beige cloth of folding case. Loose as issued in original brown cloth chemise, quarter morocco folding case original boe closures .
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

by CARROLL Lewis [ie DODGSON Charles Lutwidge] 1832-1898
The second, first published edition, 1866 In the original publishers gilt red cloth, 3 circular lines containing a picture of Alice holding the Pig on the upper cover with the Cheshire Cat to the back cover, a little rubbed & soiled, cloth worn at some extremities. Professionally re-spined, old laid down, gilt titles. Internally, half-title, frontispiece, [10], [1], 2-192 pp, frontis, with tissue guard, 42 illustrations by John Tenniel, a couple of short tears, some foxing, pale blue endpapers (earliest state), hinges with signs of repair, a.e.g. Housed in a custom red half morocco over red cloth drop-back- box, gilt titles to spine, gilt titles to morocco label to upper cover. (193*126 mm). (Crutch 46. Madan 33. Williams 10). A better than usual copy of Alice with an ownership inscription on half-title dated in the year of publication ( M.A. Watson Binfield 1866) a bookplate to fpd (Latham). The contents 'S' is normal whilst page 30 is correctly numbered. Dodgson, author, mathematician, and photographer, whose writing meant a great deal to him; writing was the main course by which he could do something for others, to fulfil a deep religious desire to contribute something to humanity-it was his offering to God. After resigning his mathematical lectureship in 1881, at the age of forty-nine (he retained his studentship and resident privileges at Christ Church to the end), he devoted himself primarily to his writing. Often standing at his upright desk (he calculated that he could stand and write for ten hours a day), he turned out a myriad of works. See ODNB.
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£10,900.00
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

by Carroll, Lewis and Salvador Dali (signed)
New York/France: Maecenas Press-Random House, 1969. Limited Edition. Folio. # 1638 of 2500 numbered portfolios printed in France on Mandeure paper, signed in pencil on the titlepage by Salvadore Dali and includes 12 color woodcut remarque illustrations. One original color etching signed in the plate, contents loose as issued in gilt-lettered cloth chemise housed within a 1/4 morocco over beige cloth clamshell, spine lettering gilt, with bone and morocco clasp. As new in original inner portion of the original shipping box and wrapped in the original paper each with their corresponding numbers of this particular issue. A remarkabley beautiful copy.
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The Game of Logic

The Game of Logic

by Carroll, Lewis
London: Macmillan and Co., 1886. First Edition. True first edition, the extremely rare suppressed issue. Bound in publisher's original red cloth lettered in gilt; with original envelope containing the playing board and all nine of the original grey (5) and red (4) counters. Near Fine with subtle repairs to spine ends, light soiling to cloth, light foxing to fore edge. Contents tanned, with a short edge tear to tissue guard at front and bookseller's ticket to rear pastedown. Envelope slightly stained with minor soiling; light toning to game board. Housed in a beautiful custom 3/4 leather morocco chemise case. This suppressed first edition was rejected by Carroll as it did not meet his high standards, though he did allow an estimated 50 copies to be sold in America. An edition deemed suitable was published the following year in 1887. Near Fine. [Attributes: First Edition]
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THE AUTHOR OF ALICE IN WONDERLAND, LAMENTS: IT IS HELPFUL AND COMFORTING, WHEN THERE IS SO MUCH SKEPTICISM, AND EVEN ATHEISM, AROUND ONE IN OXFORD, TO KNOW THOSE TO WHOM CHRISTIANITY IS NOT ONLY A REALITY, BUT THE REALITY OF LIFE.

THE AUTHOR OF ALICE IN WONDERLAND, LAMENTS: IT IS HELPFUL AND COMFORTING, WHEN THERE IS SO MUCH SKEPTICISM, AND EVEN ATHEISM, AROUND ONE IN OXFORD, TO KNOW THOSE TO WHOM CHRISTIANITY IS NOT ONLY A REALITY, BUT THE REALITY OF LIFE.

by DODGSON, CHARLES L. [LEWIS CARROLL].
1894. THE AUTHOR OF ALICE IN WONDERLAND, LAMENTS: ?IT IS HELPFUL AND COMFORTING, WHEN THERE IS SO MUCH SKEPTICISM, AND EVEN ATHEISM, AROUND ONE IN OXFORD, TO KNOW THOSE TO WHOM CHRISTIANITY IS NOT ONLY A REALITY, BUT THE REALITY OF LIFE.? DODGSON, CHARLES L. [LEWIS CARROLL]. (1832-1898). English logician, mathematician, photographer, and novelist, especially remembered for Alice?s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass (1871). Revealing Autograph Letter Signed, ?C.L. Dodgson? Four full pages, small octavo. ?Ch[rist] Ch[urch]? Oxford, England. March 18, 1894. Very fine condition. To ?My dear Mrs. Egerton? Dodgson writes: ?Your letters make me feel more and more glad that I have been allowed to add you and your girls to my list of friends. It is helpful and comforting, when there is so much skepticism, and even atheism, around one in Oxford, to know those to whom Christianity is not only a reality, but the reality of life. I shall like to come and have some chats with you. You ask if I think it ?right? to make a rule not to see Pantomimes in Lent. Surely, in one sense of the word. But the word is used in two senses (as of course you know): (1) a thing which it is wrong not to do; (2) a thing which it is not wrong to do (and also not wrong not to do). The first sense means ?it is a duty?; the second ?it is allowable? ? I think it ?right? in the second sense of the word: but I need not say that, if I thought it ?right? in the first sense, I would not go myself. But questions like this belong to the ?Church? observances, and rules of human origin ? not to the essence of Christianity. ? As life draws on to its end, I seem to feel, more and more, that all Christians, Church, and Dissent alike, are brothers (and sisters) and should love each other as such. Sincerely yours, C.L. Dodgson. My cold is better, I thank you for your kind wishes.? A most interesting letter from Dodgson?s pen. Letters where the author reflects or comments on their own personal religious beliefs rarely make it to market. In this letter, Carroll clearly approaches the topic with the mind of a mathematician and the beliefs of a theologian. Wikipedia adds some information which further reveals important background information to the possible contradictions expressed in Dodgson?s own position. They state: Charles?s father was an active and highly conservative cleric of the Church of England who later became the Archdeacon of Richmond and involved himself, sometimes influentially, in the intense religious disputes that were dividing the church. He was high church, inclining toward Anglo-Catholicism, an admirer of John Henry Newman and the Tractarian movement, and did his best to instill such views in his children. Young Charles was to develop an ambivalent relationship with his father?s values and with the Church of England as a whole. The British definition of Pantomimes is: a theatrical entertainment, mainly for children, that involves music, topical jokes, and slapstick comedy and is based on a fairy tale or nursery story, usually produced around Christmas. [Attributes: Signed Copy]
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Phantasmagoria And Other Poems.

Phantasmagoria And Other Poems.

by DODGSON, Charles L. (Lewis Carroll)
London: Macmillan & Co., 1869. FIRST EDITION FIRST ISSUE PRESENTATION COPY. 1 vol., with the chapter 'Melancholetta' incorrectly numbered 78 in the Table of Contents and no cancel title-page and without 'Author of Alice in Wonderland' to the title-page, inscribed on the half-title "Rev R. Duckworth, with the Author's sincere regards. Jan 1869." Bound in the publisher's original gilt stamped blue cloth, spine slightly darkened, all edges gilt, inner hinges just starting, outer hinges fine, head and foot of spine with minor rubbing, leather bookplate of Harry Glemby to front pastedown, housed in a 1/2 red morocco slipcase, ribbed gilt lettered spine. OF UNIQUE ASSOCIATION INTEREST BEING GIVEN BY C. L. DODGSON TO R. DUCKWORTH, HIS FRIEND AND COMPANION ON THE MEMORABLE BOATING TRIP WHICH GAVE US "ALICE IN WONDERLAND" This copy originally sold at Anderson Galleries in NY in 1926 as part of the collection of Harry Glemby. Duckworth was the person rowing the boat on the original boating expedition of 4 July 1862 during which Alice's Adventures were first told by Lewis Carroll. He is represented by the Duck in the book, a play on his last name. A more interesting presentation/association copy of this title can not be imagined. To appreciate the interest fully one must refer to the Lewis Carroll Picture Book, edited by S. Dodgson Collingwood, London, 1899, pages 358-60, where Canon Duckworth relates the whole origin of the story of Alice and the river expedition which gave rise to it. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]
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Alice s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There

by Lewis Carroll
Alice s Adventures in Wonderland. Hatfield: Pennyroyal Press, 1982. A splendid fine copy of the Limited Edition (One of 350 copies) signed by Barry Moser in the Colophon and bound by Gray Parrot in half-purple Morocco with marbled sides. Accompanied by the complete set (75) of pencil-signed wood engravings in the publisher's issue linen folder, the whole housed in the matching leather-backed clamshell case. Moser's magnum opus that launched his career into fine limited-edition publishing. Alice was sold out upon issue. A collector's copy. together with: CARROLL. LEWIS. Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There A fine copy of the Limited Edition (One of 350 copies) signed by Barry Moser in the Colophon and bound by Gray Parrot in half-purple morocco with marbled sides. Accompanied by the separate suite of pencil-signed prints housed in the publisher's issue linen folder, the whole housed in the matching leather-backed clamshell case. This production immediately followed Alice. A collector's copy. The pair uncommonly found in commerce. Collector's copies. [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]
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