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An UNRECORDED third issue of Stowe's edition of 1560.


CHAUCER (Geffrey). The Works of Jeffrey [sic] Chaucer, With Additions. Also the Siege and Destruction of the worthy City of Thebes; Compiled by John Lidgate, Monk of Bury. (Large woodcut coat of arms bearing above the escutcheon the date:) 1569. (On panel below the escutcheon:) Virtue flourisheth in Chaucer still, Though Death of him hath wrought his will. [On colophon: Imprinted at Lon= Don, by Jhon Kyngston for Jhon Wight, dwelling in Poules Churchyarde. Anno.1561.] F’cap.folio, gathered variously, printed in black-letter throughout, in double column, fifty-five lines to the page (plus running titles); wood-engraved armorial title-page as above, and emblematic fly-titles to The Canterbury Tales and The Romaunt of the Rose (without date, publisher, or printer, the extensive wood-cut frame re-used from ‘The Union of the Houses of Lancaster and York’ by John Halle, published in 1550), these all being cancels pasted onto stubs (v. note); wood-cut head-piece to ‘The Knightes Tale’ (the illustration flanked by two wood-cut pillars re-used from the quarto edition of the 1537 Coverdale Bible); colophon on final page of text followed by large wood-cut tail ornament; [-]1, A — I6, K — U, Aa — Il, Kk — Pp, Q (bis) — T (bis)6, U (bis), X8, Y, Z, Aaa — Iii, Kkk — Ttt6, Uuu8; ff.[7 unfoliated]+[i]-ccxxxij+ ccxxxij [sic!]+ ccxxxij [sic!!]+ ccxxxiij — ccxxxv+ [seven leaves variously mis-foliated, ending ccxlj (for ccxlij)]+ CCxlj [sic] — cccxxxvij+ cccxl — cccxliiij+ [one leaf foliated cccxxxix!]+ cccxlviij — ccclxxviij (despite the oddities of the pagination the catchwords and signatures are continuous throughout); old (probably late seventeenth or early eighteenth century) full panelled calf, ruled gilt and blind, tooled blind with guinea-roll and serrated rules and small oyster-shell corner ornaments in central panel, on sides, spine with five bands raised over the thick cords, ruled and tooled blind, with an all-over irregular guinea-roll diced pattern in the compartments, red lettering-piece, and bearing the date 1561 (erroneously) lettered direct between blind rules at tail; matching marbled edges and end-papers. Re-backed and the front board re-cornered, probably in the early nineteenth century, the re-back now cracking slightly over front joint and worn a little at extreme head of spine; lacking the final leaf of text, this being supplied in facsimile; title-page unobtrusively re-margined at fore-edge; small, old, repair to lower margins of A4, Lll6 and fore-margin of Rrr6; light marginal damp-stains and light dusting to gathering A, mainly affecting the fore- margins and corners of A2 — 4, the fore-margins being also very slightly frayed at the extreme edges, as likewise Uvv7 this last having three small holes just touching two letters of the text; extreme fore- and lower- margins of some leaves towards the end slightly damp-stained: so lightly as scarcely to be noticeable on most of them, but more heavily on lower margins of gathering Qqq onwards, affecting the bottom centimetre, or less, of half the margin; four unobtrusive single wormholes in second cancel, suggesting probably that the sheets were wormed whilst awaiting use; single wormhole through extreme inner margins of gathering Dd; another in extreme lower margin of Ff2, 5, and 6, and Gg1; small hole in lower margins of Lll4, Qqq3, Qqq5, and lower fore-corner of Sss5, due apparently to original paper flaws; insignificant pen trials or reader’s marks on lower margin of Cc2v and fore-margin of R5v, Nn1r, Ggg4v, and inner margin of Mm6v; pen trial on upper margin of Ji2r and small drawing of a flagon between the columns; contemporary ms. notes on Q5v and Qqq5v — the former a bold long vertical inscription, apparently recording ownership, but almost trimmed off by the eighteenth century binder; name ‘John Wyht’ — coincidentally the same as that of the 1561 publisher — written in a very small neat contemporary hand on A2r and B1r (where the Christian name appears, in contracted form, as ‘Joh[ann]es’); otherwise, and in general, an excellent, clean, crisp copy with good margins. Apparently rare.

GB £8,710.00

US $11,845.60


This appears to be an unrecorded third issue of the 1560 — 1 printing: sheets of the first issue supplied with cancel title and secondary title-pages, omitting the four leaves of prelims. (containing the dedication to Henry VIII (denominated ‘Prologue’), the Table which follows on from it, and two short prefatory poems apparently inserted originally to fill up space). It is also possible that the final leaf of text was a tipped-in cancel omitting the dated colophon, and that is why it has dropped out. The title, and the two secondary title-pages (identical to those in the 1561 edition except that the wood-cut frame is here without the top and side rules, the printer’s flower is omitted from the central panel, and the titles are in Roman face rather than black-letter), have all been modernised, in spelling as well as design. The dedication to Henry VIII and its associated leaves would have been redundant even in 1560, Henry having died in 1547, which suggests that the printer, Kyngston, used one of the variants of the William Thynne edition, most probably that of 1545 or 1550 as a setting text, copying its already antiquated style and spelling when he did so. The first collected edition of Chaucer’s works was printed in three parts in 1526 by Pynson, and was very incomplete; it was superseded by a much fuller edition, edited by William Thynne, which first published in 1532, was reprinted in undated editions in 1540 or 1542 (the former date being claimed in an early ms. addition in the British Library copy, the latter being given by CBEL, I, p.211 or NCBEL, I:557), and again either in 1545, 1546, 1550 or 1551 (depending which authority you follow), the last of these editions being distinguished in point of text principally by the fact of ‘The Ploughman’s Tale’ (a non-Chaucerian piece of Lollardy) being placed within the actual text of ‘The Canterbury Tales’ immediately preceeding ‘The Parson’s Tale’, as it is here. The present edition, issued originally with a title-page bearing the date 1560, represents a further re-printing of that, with the addition of a section of poems edited by John Stowe — this being his first published work — yet further enlarging the canon to the extent of some nineteen poems printed from manuscript sources. Sale of this edition appears to have been slow and it was re-issued with a different title-page, bearing the date 1561, using at head and side borders a wood-cut of King Henry VIII and his court. The first three gatherings in fact were entirely reprinted for that issue, this being done to permit the inclusion of twenty-two wood-cut illustrations in the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, the signatures running [floret]4 ([floret]iii being mis-signed Aiii), +6, A4, B — I6... instead of the [floret]4, A — I6... of the earlier issue. In the illustrated issue some damage to the wood-cut frame of the first secondary title is apparent which is evident also here: a crack in the wood extends from the centre of the lower edge, up through the box identifying King Henry IIII. to just left of centre of the title box, and another from the top left-hand corner of the title-box, through the box identifying King Henry VII and ending, apparently at a worm-hole, in its top rules. STC, 2nd edition, unaccountably and without assigning a reason, lists the first two issues in the reverse order — despite the evidence in the illustrated issue of the later date on the title-page, the obviously interpolated gathering ‘+’ (which contains the first six illustrated leaves of ten, the rest being in the variant, short, gathering ‘A’), and the extended splitting of the wood-block on the title-page to the Canterbury Tales which shows only a slight split at the extreme tail in the original printing, and no worm-hole. The title-page of the present third issue bears the same coat of arms as the 1560 issue but with a change of date and with wording that is otherwise entirely different. There is no record of a further printing of Chaucer’s Works until 1598 and the title-page of that is different again. The present issue dated 1569 is wholly unrecorded. Nor does the spelling of Chaucer’s Christian name with a ‘J’ instead of a ‘G’ appear to occur in any other printing. The inclusion in the present copy of a folio numbered ccxxxii no fewer than three times is correct: there is no reduplication of text, and the same thing occurs in the British Library copies of the 1560 — 61 edition; so also does the curious dropping of the lower case letters between Pp and Aaa. In addition to the systematic mis-foliations noticed above, leaf T2 (f.Ciiij) is misnumbered Ciij; Gg1 (f.Cli), Cxli; Gg6 (f.Clvi), Cxlvi; Nn6 (f.Cxcij), Ccxij; T[t]2 (f.CCxxiv), CCxxv; X[x]2 (f.ccxxxvi), ccxlij; X[x]3 (f.ccxxxvij), ccxliij; X[x]4 (f.ccxxxviij), ccxlvi; X[x]5 (f.ccxxxix), ccxliii; X[x]6 (f.ccxl), ccxliiij; X[x]7 (f.ccxli), ccxlvi; X[x]8 (f.ccxlij), ccxli; Y[y]1 (f.ccxliij), ccxli; Ddd3 (f.cclxxiij), cclxxvi; Fff1 (f.cclxxxiij), cclxxxi; Fff2 (f.cclxxxiiij), cclxxxiii; Kkk3 (f.cccix), cccviij; Kkk4 (f.cccx), cccix; Lll3 (f.cccxv), cccxvj; Lll4 (f.cccxvi), cccxvij; Ppp2 (f.cccxxxviij), ccclx; Qqq1 (f.cccxlv), cccxxxix; Qqq2 (f.cccxlvj), cccxlviij; Sss4 (f.ccclxij), ccclxiij; Uvv7 (f.ccclxxvij), ccclxvij. There is no catch-word present on Fff1v. The number 100 is variously represented by a capital or lower-case ‘c’, apparently distinguishing changes of compositor. STC 5076 (but an unrecorded variant)

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Ref: ART100025



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Prose Romance: "A Unique instance of an English continuation of one of the Spanish romances".


[SHIRLEY or SHURLEY (John)]. [Within typographical border:] The Honour Of Chivalry. Or, The Famous and Delectable History Of Don Bellianis of Greece. Containing The Valiant Exploits of that Magnanimous and Heroick Prince; Son unto the Emperour Don Bellaneo of Greece. Wherein are described, the Strange and Dangerous Ad- Ventures that befel him: with his Love toward the Princess Florisbella, Daughter to the Soldan of Babylon. [Rule] Translated out of Italian. [Rule] Sed tamen est tristissima janua nostræ, Et est unus tempora a prima pati. [Rule] London, Printed for Tho. Passinger, at the Three Bibles on London-Bridge, 1683. Sm.4to, not watermarked; half-title not called for; leaf headed‘The Translator’s Epistle to the Gentle Reader’ [not signed], follows title leaf; pp.[iv]+124+123 — 242; A — I, K — U, X — Hh4. BOUND WITH: [SHIRLEY or SHURLEY (John)]. [Within a typographical border:] The Honour of Chivalry: The Second and Third Part: Being a continuation Of the First Part of the History Of the Renowned Prince Don Bellianis Of Greece. Containing his many strange and won- Derful Adventures; as Fights with Monsters and Gy- Ants, Dissolving Inchantments, Rescuing Distressed Ladies, overthrowing Tyrants, and obtaining the fair Princess Florisbella in Marriage. Together, with the rare Adventures of Many other Heroick Emperours, Kings, Princes, and Knights, with their Amorous Intrigues and fortunate Success in their Undertakings. [Rule] Being worthy the perusal of all Persons, as well for its pleasant- Ness as the profit that they may accrue thereby. [Rule] Written by J.S. Gent. [Rule] London, Printed for T. Passinger, at the Sign of the Three Bibles, on London-Bridge. 1683. Apparently Imp.16mo in quarter sheets (i.e., gathered in fours), the watermark being a large crown and the chain-lines running horizontally; half-title not called for; leaf headed To the Reader and signed at end ‘J. Shurley’ follows title leaf; large historiated initials throughout; pp.[4]+167+[i (blank)]; A2, B — I, K — U, X — Y4. Two volumes bound in one, both printed in black letter and Roman type; nineteenth century full Russia bound after a seventeenth century model, the sides with gilt panel surrounded by broad leaf-and-flower rolls, the spine with four bands and five panels, ruled and tooled elaborately gilt and lettered direct in the second panel; decorative gilt rolls to edges of boards and turn-ins; a.e.g.; end-papers faced light brown. Later re-back, preserving the old backstrip; small puncture to leather (only) in centre of front board; in the the first part: some of the (mostly early) leaves cropped rather close at some lower edges with loss of about twenty catchwords and all or part of the last line of text on leaves A4, C4v, F1, F4r, H1, H2, and H4; paper flaws to blank fore-margin of U1, and blank lower margin of 2C4; small chip to blank lower margin of Z3; neat repair to lower margin of 2G1 with loss of two or three words on the recto; pen trials on blank margins of 2B2v and 2B3r; in the second part: strip lacking from blank lower margins of G3 and G4, due to an original paper fault; insignificant marking to a few scattered leaves in both volumes; otherwise nice.

GB £1,800.00

US $2,448.00


Two volumes evidently printed and issued separately, but in the same year, and usually found together. The First Part, translated from the Italian version of Oration Rinaldi, published in 1598, contains like its model only the first fifty of the sixty-eight chapters of the original Spanish romance, Historia del magnanimo, et invincibil principe Belianis de Grecia, by Jer¢nimo Fern ndez, published in Spain in 1545. It was not, and does not claim to have been, translated into English by Shirley, but is a reprint of the 1650 version translated by Francis Kirkman and reprinted several times up until 1673. Kirkman had added a Second and a Third Part, both written by himself, in 1664 and 1672, and the present Second and Third Parts consist of a paraphrase of them by Shirley, who writes in his remarks ‘To the Reader’ at the start of Part Two that the romance is “now illustrated and put into the newest dialect” by himself. He also added some rather bad verse. These Parts provide “the unique instance of an English continuation of one of the Spanish romances” (Henry Thomas, Spanish and Portuguese Romances of Chivalry’, CUP, 1920, pp.257-8.), and are set partly in England and Ireland. In this copy, possibly as always, p.38 of Part One has been misnumbered ‘93’, and p.39 ‘38’; p.69 ends ‘hap=’ whilst p.70 begins ‘happiness’; and gathering 2C has been laid-out wrongly in the forme, pp.200 and 201 following p.195, and pp.196 and 197, preceding p.202 (which is mis-numbered ‘102)’, whilst the signature mark ‘Cc2’ appears correctly at the foot of p.197 but as the last leaf of the gathering and backed, of course, by the incorrectly numbered p.‘101’. The front pastedown bears the engraved armorial bookplate of Henry Francis Lyte, writer of the hymns ‘Abide with Me’ and ‘Praise my Soul the King of Heaven’, and sometime tutor to the Prime Minister, Lord Salisbury. The verso of the second binder’s blank bears the 1883 rubber ownership stamp of Alexander Gardyne. The first printing of the version by Shirley (not reprinted until 1703) and very scarce. COPAC records only the Oxford, National Library of Scotland, Leeds, and Lambeth Palace copies. Wing (2nd Edition), F780; ESTC, R24084

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Ref: BRT120830



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Extensively revised and corrected by the author as copy for a later printing.


[ANDERTON (JAMES).].The Protestants Apologie For the Roman Church. Deuided into three seuerall Tractes. Whereof The first { Concerneth the Antiquity & Continuance of the Ro- Man Church & Religion, euer since the Apostles [sic] ti mes. [sic] The second { 1. That the Protestants Religion was not so much as In being, at, or before Luthers [sic] first appearing. { 2. That the Marks of the true Church are apperteyning To the Roman, and wholly wanting to the seuerall Churches, begun by Luther & Caluin. The third { That Catholics are no lesse loyall, and dutifull to Their Soueraigne, than Protestants. All which is vndertaken, & proued by testimonies of the learned Protestants themselues. With A Conclusion to the reuerend Iudges, and other the grauve And learned Sages of the law. By Iohn Brereley Priest. Deut.32.Vers.31. For their God is not as our God, euen our enemies being iudges. And I will set the gyptians against the gyptians: so euery one shall fight Against his brother. Esay 19.Vers.2. Permissu Superiorum. [St Omer, English College Press,] Anno M.DC.VIII. [1608]. Pott 4to format, not watermarked; half-title not called for; first gathering, ¶, a cancel; title-page, ‘Authors [sic] Advertisement to Him That shall answere this Treatise’ on verso of title and the three following leaves, followed by ‘A table Of the contents Of the several tracts, Chapters, and sections Conteyned in this Booke’, 6pp., ‘A Catalogve of Certaine Fathers: And the yeares in which they liued’, 2pp., A table of Certaine protestant Wryters, and their Particvlar vvritings: Whose folio, or page (for more ready, and certaine direction) Are speciallie alleadged in the subsequent Discourse: And Of their seuerall Editions or yeare of print...’, 9pp., ‘To the reader’, 1p., Preface, pp.1 — 56, dedication ‘To The Kinges Most excellent Maiesty, 4pp., The First tract, pp.57 — 262, [blank (pp.263 -264)], ‘The Second tract’ pp.265 — 639, [blank page (not included in numbering)], ‘The third Tract’, pp.640 — 711, [blank (p.712)], ‘The Conclvsion To The ivdges And covnsell Of England’, pp.[713] — 751; ‘An Alphabeticall Table or index Directing the Reader to the Principall matters conteyned In this Booke’, 25pp., ‘Fovre several Catalogves Of the Forraine Protestants adverse VVritinges one against other’, 4pp., ‘A second Catalogve Of bookes pvblished By the Calvinists, Against The Lutherans’, 4pp., ‘A third Catalogve Of bookes pvblished By the Lvtherans Against The Caluinistes’. 5pp., ‘A fovrth Catalogve Of the protestants Many bookes And vvritinges In generall...’ 10«pp., ‘The avthors [sic] Aduertisment to the Reader’, 1«pp. ‘A Table of certaine Additions, omissions, and other Errours escaped in the Printing’ 8pp., ‘Certaine omissions Which being longer Then to be corrected by the Readers [sic] pen, are heere placed Togeather, that the Reader may yet at his pleasure di- Scerne how, and where they are to come in, by way Of reading. And in reprinting of this Treatise They may be inserted in their Proper places’, 10pp., ‘An Addition of certaine Errovrs and omissions Besides the former’, 4pp.; ¶4, *3, **4, ***2 A — G4, H6, I, K — T, V, X — Ii, KK — Tt, Vu, XX — Iii, Kkk — Ttt, Vvv, Xxx — Iiii, Kkkk — Tttt, Vuuu4, Xxxx6, Yyyy — Iiiii, Kkkkk, Lllll4; later full calf to style, applied spine, elaborately tooled blind on sides, spine with raised bands, tooled blind, lettered gilt; a.e. burnished brown; oil-marbled end-papers. Front board rubbed at edges, and detached, back board lacking, spine very chipped and rubbed, but sewing tight and sound; title-page and last two leaves dusty; light damp-staining to Tttt3 onwards; occasional fingering of corners; last two leaves chipped at head and restored with old paper bearing notes (v. below); 575 errata, and close to 100 additions and omitted notes, some running to upwards of two hundred words, corrected or added in text, in ink, in a small, neat, contemporary hand (v. note), those in the extreme margins insignificantly cropped; slip of old paper tipped onto penultimate leaf, bearing an additional note, written into the text, but not noted in the printed ‘Additions’, etc.; small cinder hole to blank inner margin of Fff4; small hole in Xxx1 due to an original paper flaw, with loss of part of two words; worming to blank inner margins from Ttt4 to Ffff2, not touching text and for the most part barely visible; in general, however a very nice, crisp copy.

GB £3,400.00

US $4,624.00


An important text, vastly expanded from the original printing of 1604 published in Douay, probably by J. Mogur, which, according to the British Library listing, had only 191pp. There were three issues of the 1608 printing, successively expanded, this, with the first gathering a cancel, and the added leaves 5L3 and 5L4 at the end, being the last and most complete. Further editions were published in 1610, 1615, 1623, and 1624, the last two posthumous, the author having died in 1618. Remarkable for its balance, detail, and a scholarly intent unusual in the period, as also for the several exhaustive bibliographical checklists it contains, it was reprinted as recently as 1970, 1971, and 2013. In the present copy the brief errata have been corrected throughout, including those noted in the last two supplementary leaves, whilst the longer additions and omissions have been added where possible in their place (such as the 222 word addition written on the blank verso of 2K4), and otherwise cross-referenced to the printed sections at the end. The printed alterations run only to p.733, but the notes added in ms. to 5L4v carry the corrections through to p.740, whilst the slip pasted onto 5L2v adds an addition not recorded in the printed text, though corrected in ms. in its place, and there are notes added in ms. to p.747 and to 5D3r that are not otherwise recorded at all. Nor are some other additions, including a ms. index to the sections, that are added to the title-page. All are in the same hand. This, together with the fact that the corrections of errata have been so exhaustive — extending even to minor matters of style, as ‘grounded not only’ for ‘not grounded only’ at l.9, p.24, a correction that surely a common reader would not have bothered to make on so densely printed a text — suggest that this is in fact an author’s copy, prepared when the book was being printed to enable the preparation of the added leaves of errata, and used by him, probably, as a printer’s copy for the editions either of 1610 or 1615. The nature of some of the thumb-marks in some lower corners are in fact suggestive of a printing shop, whilst the author himself in his ‘Advertisment’ on 5I2r indicates that the errors and additions “being heere exactly gathered by the Author himself,” the reader may “expect in the next Edition, or reprinting of this Treatise, such errours and Omissions as haue now escaped, to be corrected, and inserted into their proper places.” That this is a printer’s copy is supported further by the nature of some of the ms. notes, one at the foot of p.39, for instance, running: “read what is to be here inserted at the end of this booke on yt besyde of the first leaf of Omissions etc. there place yt under Pag.39". The title-page bears an ownership inscription which we have not been able to decipher, written, apparently, in another hand, but which at any rate does not say ‘Anderton’. It may have been added by an early owner, or have been that of the printer or typesetter. The work has sometimes been attributed to James Anderton’s younger brother, Lawrence, who eventually became a Jesuit, but this is now known not to have been the case. He may have had some part in it, however, for on I5v the author states: “I must needes acknowledge, that a good part of this labour was the collections of a Worshipfull and reuerend Priest, gathered together some few yeares before he entered into holy Orders". In this copy, probably as always, p.146 is mis-numbered ‘246’, and p.360 ‘560’, 2I2 is mis-signed ‘3’; 2M1 has the catchword ‘48’ instead of ‘49’; and gathering 4X is foliated, not paginated, without breaking the numbering, pagination being resumed with gathering 4Y. STC 3604.5; STC (2nd edition), 3605; ESTC S233; Alison & Rogers, Catholic Books, 133; the Americas are mentioned on p.521, but it is not in Sabin; COPAC records copies at the British Library, Oxford, York Minster, and Hereford Cathedral only.

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Ref: ART120822



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Reading edition apparently shortened and revised by the author.


DICKENS (Charles). The poor traveller: Boots at the Holly-Tree Inn: And Mrs. Gamp. By Charles Dickens. London: Chapman and Hall, 193, Piccadilly, 1864. F’cap 8vo; half-title not called for; final leaf integral advertisements for the ‘Illustrated Library Edition’ and the ‘Cheap and Uniform Edition’, verso blank; pp.114+[ii]; lime green wrappers printed on sides in black, the front wrapper not bearing a date, the back wrapper advertising under the heading ‘Cheap and uniform editions Of Mr. Dickens’s Christmas Books’ the four titles already published in the series (i.e., the whole series except for the present title); issued without free end-papers. Slight chipping to paper of spine; light marking to first and last two leaves and a very few fox-spots; extensive pencilled excision marks and alterations to the text of ‘The Poor Traveller’, evidently intended to produce a shorter reading version (v. note); otherwise a nice copy.

GB £2,400.00

US $3,264.00


The alterations to the text are in a hand closely resembling Dickens’ own, and some of them — in particular the addition of the word ‘above’ after ‘gallery’ in l.10 on p.30, and the substitution of ‘his history’ for ‘everything’ at l.15 on p.18, which are not necessitated by any of the cuts and are in fact mainly stylistic changes — are of a kind that one would not expect unless they were authorial. The excision marks, the text to be omitted outlined in pencil, with the outlined area being filled by cross-hatching or diagonal strokes, is a method known to have been used by Dickens for a similar purpose in other reading copies. In a few places a word or a sentence has been underlined for emphasis when reading, this also being the general habit of the author. One or two other marks are less interpretable but may be intended to indicate ‘louder’ or ‘softer’. Though there is no sign of provenance, the volume was purchased in 2008 at the Bloomsbury Auction sale of the residue of the Dobson family papers, as part of a bundle, and it may have come to them directly from a Dickens family source. Philip Collins, Charles Dickens[:] The Public Readings (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1975), p.155, declares that the volume “has not been reprinted since the 1858 trade edition", which, given the date on the title-page of the present copy, is evidently false. Though printed by Bradbury and Evans like the 1858 edition, this copy bears the publisher’s imprint of Chapman and Hall on both the title-page and cover (the cover imprints having for both publisher and printer an ampersand instead of the word ‘and’), and would appear to rank as the first Chapman and Hall edition. The relationship between both the printed and the adapted text here, and that of the ‘prompt copy’ text recorded by Collins, is unclear, this copy retaining in the printed version some text excised from the prompt copy before it was printed and excluding some text that the prompt copy retains, while the revised text coincides with the post-printing revisions in the prompt copy on occasion, but elsewhere differs, the major difference in this shortened version being the entire exclusion of Mary Marshall as a character (though she is still referred to at the start as the reason for Richard Doubledick having signed up). There is evidence that the cuts were made in two distinct series. It was frequent publisher’s practice at the time to date volumes a year ahead, in which case this copy may actually have been ready (or published) in 1863, and may conceivably have been used as part of Dickens’s preparation for a reading he gave in London on the 12th of June, though it is more probable perhaps that it may relate simply to the reading given in Glasgow on the 25th of February, 1869, which, as recorded in the Letters, his agent, Dolby, rather to his annoyance, advertised by mistake.

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Ref: CRT118586



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With two good letters (and possibly also a final book proof).


BLACKMORE (R.D.). Christowell. A Dartmoor Tale. By R.D. Blackmore, Author of “Mary Anerley,” etc. In three volumes. London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, Crown Buildings, 188, Fleet Street, 1882 [?December, 1881]. (All rights reserved.) 3 Vols.; half-titles not called for; final blank in volumes one and three; pp.[iv]+302+[ii]; [iv]+300; [iv]+317+[iii]; diagonal fine ribbed maroon cloth, ruled blind, blocked with publisher’s monogram within ruled circle, blind, on sides, ruled blind, lettered and with short rule gilt on spine; t.e. uncut, fore-edges rough trimmed; end-papers coated cream. Barely perceptible fading to cloth of spines; occasional light foxing; otherwise a fine copy.

GB £2,250.00

US $3,060.00


Tipped onto the front end-papers of volumes one and two are signed holograph letters from the author to a Dr. Wood dated, from Paddington, May 22nd 1878 (approximately 200 words), and Dec 8th 1881 (approximately 70 words), the first thanking Dr. Wood (who is apparently in Devon) for the copies of “his elegant books", saying of himself that he has “given up the fiction” and is absorbed in gardening, and mentioning some friends, etc.; the second speaking of “the loss of a relation” and giving his reasons for never furnishing biographical particulars about himself. The front pastedown in each volume bears the armorial bookplate of Laurence Bernard Gomme. The production of this copy is a little curious, the prelims. of each volume, and the final leaf, U6 in volume two and X8 in volume three, being on a different paper stock of a pleasantly creamier colour than the rest of the book. U6, the final leaf of text in volume two, and the blank X8 in volume three, are therefore single insets, as are what should have been their conjugates, U1 and X1, those leaves being of the regular paper stock. U6 and X8 at least, and possibly the prelims. to all the volumes, are therefore cancels. This is not mentioned either by Sadleir or Wolff, and was not so in another copy that passed through our hands some time ago. Since the present copy may well have been given to Dr. Wood by the author, as is suggested by the date on the second letter, it is possible that it was a final book proof sent to Blackmore to check some corrected text. Sadleir, 220; Wolff, 527. Number nine on Sadleir’s schedule of comparative scarcities.

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Ref: CRT120850



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Lytton Strachey's copy, with his comments.


HUGO (Victor). L’homme Qui rit. Tome premier [deuxième; troisième; quatrième]. Paris, Librairie Internationale, 15, Boulevard Montmartre, A. Lacroix, Verboeckhoven & Ce, éditeurs, A Bruxelles, á Leipzig et á Livourne, 1869. Tous droits de traduction et de reproduction réservés. 4 Vols., Demy 8vo; each volume complete with half-title, and Table at end; pp.381+[i (blank)]; 307+[i (blank)]; 296; 384; [?]Edwardian half brown fine-morocco cloth ruled and lettered gilt on spine, black fine-morocco paper covered sides; marbled edges. Slight wear to corners of boards and small chips to cloth at head of spines; small Dewey number in white at tail of each spine, and library de-accession stamp on verso of each title-page; some pencilled scoring and numerous notes in first two volumes (v. note); a very little scattered foxing, and small stains to 9:8 of volume one and 10:1 of volume three, the latter just touching next, and 15:1 in the same volume opened a trifle roughly at top edge; in general a nice copy in a serviceable but unlovely binding.

GB £450.00

US $612.00


From the library of Lytton Strachey, with his small bookplate on each front paste-down and below it a label reading: “Reading University Library. From the collection of Mr. James Strachey. Presented by Mrs. Strachey", the latter two names partly obliterated in black ink. The set was evidently rebound, presumably for Lytton, but at some point after he had read it (as far as he got!) as some of the pencilled notes are slightly cropped. They are scattered throughout volume one and the first seventy-eight pages of volume two, after which, possibly, exasperation took over and he gave up. They are written in French and English, and range in extent from a simple proofing mark, through comments such as ‘Oh, V.H!’ and ‘Do crows fly at night?’ to passages of more than fifty words, for the most part criticising Hugo’s poor knowledge of English terminology, history, and customs, or, at times, his thought, and they appear, in all, on some seventeen pages. Carteret I, 423. Vicaire IV 341. Talvart-Place IX n.67. The issue with the joint Paris/Brussels imprint; there was also an issue just with the Brussels imprint.

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Ref: CRT119980



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One of 25 copies in this binding.


BROWNING (Robert). Christmas-eve And Easter-day. A Poem. London: Chapman & Hall, 186, Strand, 1850. F’cap 8vo; imprint leaf at end, blank on verso; pp.[iv]+142+[ii]; dull green fine diaper cloth, ruled border (two thick rules enclosing one thin rule) and oval centre-piece, blind, on sides, spine with blind decorated bands at head and foot, and lettered in gilt ‘CHRISTMAS / EVE / AND / EASTER DAY / (short rule) / BROWNING // CHAPMAN / & HALL; a.e. uncut; end-papers coated yellowish cream. Cloth slightly chipped at head- and tail- of spine, and worn slightly over front joint; stitching broken after gathering E, and gathering F detached (v. note); neat inscription dated ‘Feby. 9th. 1864’ on half-title (v. note); otherwise a nice copy.

GB £130.00

US $176.80


A scarce volume, published when its author was merely “the husband of Mrs. Browning", and preceding by some years most of the work for which he was to be remembered. Wise, 6, but a later binding, and without the August 1849 catalogue present in the first issue. Carter, ‘Binding Variants’, pp.97-8 records bindings in three distinct grains of cloth, of which this is the second (the third dating, he suggests, from 1864 or later). The present binding differs from the two copies Carter had encountered in the second style of cloth, however, by having blind rules on the sides instead of a ‘decorated border’ and having an ampersand in the spine imprint as in the first issue instead of the word ‘AND’. We would normally have restored the present copy (which could be done quite easily) instead of offering it in its present distressed state, but the card backing to the spine made visible by the broken stitching has fortunately written on its back an instruction to the binder of some bibliographical interest: “25 Brownings Xmas Eve / wanted". This suggests in the first place that there may only ever have been twenty-five copies put up in the present binding (which we would describe for want of other evidence as the third binding and fourth issue), and secondly makes clear the extraordinarily small number of copies that may at this date constitute a binding batch. On the evidence of the inscription, we would suggest that the present binding batch dates almost certainly from the Christmas season of 1863, and makes Carter’s suggestion of 1864 for the subsequent plainer binding in sand-grain cloth look very probable.
Ref: HRT104997



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Advance copy with author's signature.


BALLANTYNE (R.M.). Blown to bits Or The lonely man of Rakata. A Tale of the Malay Archipelago. With Illustrations by the Author. London: James Nisbet & Co., 21 Berners Street, 1889. (All rights reserved.). Globe 8vo, wire-stitched; frontispiece, engraved and letterpress titles, and four plates; half-title not called for; integral advertisement leaf at end; pp.[viii]+438+[ii]; bevelled mustard buckram, blocked with publisher’s monogram device black on back cover, ruled, blocked, and lettered black, Indian red, and bright gilt, blocked matt gilt, light and dark green, on front cover, ruled and blocked black, gilt, and Indian red, ruled matt gilt, lettered bright gilt, mustard and gilt outlined black, and mustard and gilt outlined red, on spine; t.e. brown; end-papers coated dark chocolate. A little very light foxing to the first and last two leaves; otherwise a fine copy.

GB £140.00

US $190.40


Advance copy, with the publisher’s compliments rubber stamp in purple ink on the verso of the front free end-paper. This was evidently one of the copies sent to the author, the front end-paper bearing a tipped-on slip with Ballantyne’s signature, clipped from a cancelled cheque. Ballantyne’s bibliographer Eric Quayle, informed us in a letter some years ago that slips bearing Ballantyne’s signature were pasted in “probably by Jeanie, his wife, who, after her husband’s death in 1894, pasted spare autograph signatures in the titles still remaining on their shelves, or so his surviving daughter told me!” In our experience a scarce title — possibly because wire-stitched bindings tended not to wear well, though this one is entirely crisp and sound. Quayle, 83a; Sadleir, 100, listing a copy in blue-grey cloth with very dark grey end-papers, for which he erroneously gives the date ‘1886’ — an obvious typo: Ballantine’s Preface is dated ‘1889’; not in Wolff.

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Ref: CRT100493



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Antiquarian General Literature.


[MARCELLINE (GEORGE).]. The triumphs of King Iames the First, of Great Brittaine, France, and Ireland, King; Defender of the Faith. Published vpon his Maiesties aduertisement to all the kings, princes, and potentates of Christendome, and confirmed by the wonderfull workes of God, declared in his life. Deuoted, dedicated, and consecrated to the most excellent Prince Henry Prince of Wales. [London,] Printed at Brittaines Bursse, [by William Jaggard] for Iohn Budge, and are there to be solde, 1610. F’cap 4to, so watermarked; wood-engraved coat of arms within border of type ornaments on C2v; pp.[xvi (not paginated)]+95+[i (blank)]; A2, B — I, K — O4, P2; later quarter dark red morocco-faced roan, lighter red sand-grain cloth sides; light buff end-papers. Small worm-track to leather on front cover; inserted leaf carrying an old pen facsimile precedes title-page; most of title page lacking and the remains laid down on leaf of period paper; staining to large lower fore-corners throughout; gatherings N and O recornered, and one leaf also with repair to chipped margin, with some loss to marginal rules, but none to text; O1 and O2 reinserted on stubs, O1 with small restorations to paper and loss in all of about a dozen scattered words, O2 laid down on an inserted leaf, and with large chip to lower fore-corner and fore-margin, and with loss to rules and to all or part of four words. A poor copy of a very scarce title, but a good working copy nonetheless.

GB £280.00

US $380.80


Entered in the Stationers’ Register by the printer, William Jaggard, on 11th June, 1610. ESTC, S111857; STC (2nd Edition), 17309, recording two copies only in the U.S.A; COPAC records the British Library, Cambridge, National Library of Scotland, York Minster, Birmingham, Durham, Edinburgh, and Leeds copies.

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Ref: ART120820



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Fantasy in macaronic verse that served as a model for Rabelais.


COCCAIUS (Merlinius [pseudonym of Teofilo Folengo, 1496-1544]). Opus Merlini Cocaii Poetæ Mantvani Macaronicorum. Totum in pristinam formam per me Magistrum Ac- Quarium Lodolam optime redactum, in his infra no- Tatis titulis diuisum. ZANITONELLA, quæ de amore Tonelli erga Zani- Nam tractat. Quæ constat ex tredecim Sonolegijs, septem Ecclogis, & vna Strambottolegia. PHANTASIAE Macaronicon, diuisum in vigintiquin- Que Macaronicis, tractans de gestis magnanimi, & pruden- Tissimi Baldi. MOSCHAEAE [sic] Facetus liber in tribus partibus diuisus, & Tractans de cruento certamine Muscarum & Formicarum. LIBELLVS Epistolarum, & Epigrammatum, ad varias per- Sonas directarum. [Woodcut device with legend ‘SCIENTIA IMMVTABILIS’]. Venetijs, apud Beuilacquam. 1613. Pott 12mo format (watermarked ‘B b’ and something uninterpretable between that may perhaps be a pot); text and wood-engraved illustration on verso of title-page (repeated on C11); twenty-five other wood-engraved illustrations in the text; decorated initial letters and tailpieces throughout; pp.541+[i (blank)]+[vi (Tabvla (not paginated)]+[i (Registrvm and publisher’s imprint)]+[iii (blank)]; A — I, K — T, V, X — Z12; old full dark brown polished sheep, elaborately tooled blind on sides, spine with four bands raised over the cords, tooled blind, lettered directly, gilt; later end-papers laid over the old paste-downs the seventeenth or eighteenth printed pattern of which shows faintly through. Two pinprick-size wormholes to leather of joins only noticed because the later end-papers are wormed at gutters, as are the first few leaves of text, unobtrusively, at extreme inner margins; title-leaf strengthened at long edges and lightly dusty; insignificant damp-staining to a few leaves; otherwise a nice copy, very prettily bound.

GB £225.00

US $306.00


First published in 1517 in seventeen books, and expanded in 1521 to twenty-five, this is at least the sixth printing of the expanded edition. It is based on the one published in Venice in 1581, but the wood-engravings differ from their originals in detail and must have been re-cut. The device on the title-page is that of Lazarus Zetzner of Strasbourg, who is generally reckoned, therefore, to have been the printer of the volume. Macaronic poetry, was developed from the comic Latin verse form by the introduction of vernacular words with appropriate but absurd Latin endings, and the application by Folengo of Latin rules of form and syntax to the Italian language popularised it for a time within that country. ‘Opus Merlini Cocaii’ is a kind of fantasy, relating the adventures of a fictitious hero named Baldo, who suffers imprisonment; battles with local authorities, pirates, shepherds, witches, and demons; and takes a journey to the underworld. Throughout his adventures Baldo is accompanied by various companions, among them a giant, a centaur, a magician, and his best friend Cingar, a trickster. It is best remembered now for providing a model for Rabelais to whom it appealed by its, at times, gross, mockery of the clergy. In this copy p.85 is mis-paged ‘83’, p.365 is mis-paged ‘395’, and p.339 is mis-paged ‘739’. Brunet, II, pp.1318-9.

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Ref: ART120828



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With alteration and scoring indicating revisions made in the second edition.


BROWNING (Robert). Dramatis personæ. Chapman and Hall, 193 Piccadilly, 1864. Lacking the half-title; Contents leaf, in any case a single inset, here also apparently a cancel; fly title to each poem, included in the pagination; integral advertisement leaf at end; pp.[iv (ex vi)]+250+[ii]; dull red pebble grain cloth, ruled and blocked blind on sides, ruled, blocked, and lettered gilt on spine; top- and fore- edges uncut, lower-edges rough trimmed; end-papers coated chocolate. Barely perceptible fading to cloth of spine; back free end-paper slightly frayed at fore-margin; otherwise a very nice copy.

GB £180.00

US $244.80


On p.150 at l.13 the words ‘, then a joy,’ have been crossed through in ink and the words ‘out of pain,’ substituted for them in a hand that closely resembles the author’s. The alteration was in fact made in the second edition of the same year. Light pencil scoring against three verses in the poem ‘The Worst of It’ (verses 14, 15, and 18) coincide with minor alterations to punctuation also made in the second edition. Many of Browning’s best known poems are found in this volume, including ‘Rabbi Ben Ezra’, ‘Caliban upon Setebos’, ‘Gold Hair’, ‘May and Death’, and ‘Mr. Sludge, “The Medium"’. Wise, p.26; Ashley Library, I, p.120; Hayward, 254; Tinker, 422.

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Ref: HRT120821



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