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Running an Indie Bookstore, With Churchillian Resolve

 08/01/2018

Churchill died in 1965 at age 90, leaving an output of more than 40 titles and volumes that have been reprinted in some 8,000 different editions by now. Those now lie in the hands of Barry Singer, 60, owner of Chartwell Booksellers in Midtown Manhattan — “The World’s Only Winston Churchill Bookshop.” 

There are also roughly 800 books about Churchill, said Mr. Singer, who added that he’s had a copy of all of them in the store at some point. His inventory ranges from a $10 paperback of “Churchill on Europe” to a 1906 first-edition softcover of “For Free Trade,” written by the man himself, and stored in a safe at the shop. It goes for a “negotiable” $185,000, Mr. Singer said.

Rare editions of every title Churchill authored can be glimpsed on five shelves locked behind glass doors in the rear of the store: from a first edition of “The Story of the Malakand Field Force” ($5,500), to a signed volume of one of his final works, “A History of the English Speaking Peoples” ($6,500).

The shop has hung on as one of the last independent bookstores in Midtown Manhattan partly because of Mr. Singer’s own Churchillian tenaciousness, and also because the skyscraper’s owners, the Fisher Brothers, have long extended a “favorable” financial arrangement to Mr. Singer, he said.

Read the full article by Corey Kilgannon for The New York Times
 
Churchill died in 1965 at age 90, leaving an output of more than 40 titles and volumes that have been reprinted in some 8,000 different editions by now. Those now lie in the hands of Barry Singer, 60, owner of Chartwell Booksellers in Midtown Manhattan — “The World’s Only Winston Churchill Bookshop.”